Articles tagged with: China

14
December
2014

China-US Space Relations See Small but Important Step

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

China-US Space Relations See Small but Important Step

Marco Caceres, a space analyst with the Teal Group, called the CSM change a "win-win" for both sides.

"Every time you cooperate, every time you fulfill or submit a request, that is how you build relationships," Caceres said. "Particularly if the US is coming to see China as their next military rival in space, and they are doing an awful lot and spending a lot more money on both military and non-military space, potentially [this new agreement] could be significant because it strengthens the relationship."

Media Outlet: Defense News Tags China | Situational Awareness | Space Debris

14
November
2014

China's New Stealth Fighter Isn't Great, But It May Not Need To Be

Featuring: Richard L. Aboulafia

China's New Stealth Fighter Isn't Great, But It May Not Need To Be

"This tells us three things: One, this new export campaign is an export of an export; two, they don't have the technology themselves; and three, they're relying on Russian engines, which are no great prize," says Richard Aboulafia, VP of Analysis at the Teal Group Corporation.

He also has numerous questions about what's inside the FC-31. For example, how advanced are the jet's active electronically scanned array (AESA) radars, electronic warfare systems, and sensor fusion? "That's a big capability—fusing all the sensor inputs together into an air combat management picture for the pilot," Aboulafia says. "That's huge. It's one of the key enablers in fighter technology."

He doubts there's much of a foreign market for the FC-31, especially not in China-leery East Asia. And while the Chinese could begin serial production of their own J-31 fighter in five years, "it's not really clear what they get out of that," he says. By the end of the decade, the United States would have already rolled out hundreds of Joint Strike Fighters, which, development problems aside, will be superior planes.

Media Outlet: Popular Mechanics Tags China | Shenyang FC-31 | Stealth Fighter

15
May
2014

Pakistan Wants Drones, and It Doesn't Need America's Permission to Get Them

Featuring: Philip Finnegan

Pakistan Wants Drones, and It Doesn't Need America's Permission to Get Them

It's probably not a deal-breaker for a country like Pakistan if Chinese drones lack the ability to transmit information, or resolution, the way American-made models do. "The Chinese technology will be less advanced," Phil Finnegan, the director of corporate analysis for Teal Group, says. "But it's a big advance over not having the technology at all." Pakistan may actually get a better deal partnering with China to tailor still-developing technology to its desired range for lethal strikes, and custom-fit weapons it already has for drones.

Media Outlet: National Journal Tags China | Drones | Pakistan

18
April
2014

Export Controls Threaten U.S. Edge in Foreign UAV Markets

Featuring: Philip Finnegan

Export Controls Threaten U.S. Edge in Foreign UAV Markets

Phil Finnegan, director of corporate analysis at the Teal Group, agreed that the control regime could prevent U.S. drone manufacturers from accessing emerging markets.  “There’s definitely a risk of losing market share because of MTCR,” he said. “As this technology spreads worldwide, the U.S. and Israel are not going to be the only exporters. New potential exporters include Turkey and India. China is developing a wide range of UAVs and is beginning to get into the export market.”

Turkey is one of 34 MTCR members. Israel, China and India do not have to abide by the regime’s export rules.  Some change has occurred in the interpretation of the MTCR, allowing U.S. allies to purchase certain systems, Finnegan said. The Australian Navy has purchased the Triton, the U.S. Navy’s maritime version of the Global Hawk for surveillance missions at sea. South Korea is also interested in the Triton, while Japan has indicated a desire to own the U.S. Air Force’s version of the UAV, he said.

“You are also seeing a trend where U.S. companies are being proactive and trying to develop export versions of UAVs that are saleable,” Finnegan said. General Atomics did just that with its Predator XP, an unarmed version of the medium-altitude, long-endurance UAV flown by the U.S. military. The United Arab Emirates was able to procure an XP because it is specifically designed to not carry weapons and its maximum payload is below the 500-kilogram threshold.  General Atomics officials declined to comment for this story.  

“Allies will buy these versions that may not have the capabilities that U.S. forces use but suit their purposes fine,” Finnegan said. “That opens the way for a country like Saudi Arabia to purchase these kinds of high-end UAVs.”

Media Outlet: National Defense Tags China | Foreign Military Sales | Global Hawk | India | South Korea | Triton | Turkey | UAVs

09
April
2014

Note To China: Get Out of the Airplane Business – Leave it to Boeing and Airbus

Featuring: Richard L. Aboulafia

Note To China: Get Out of the Airplane Business – Leave it to Boeing and Airbus

Aviation consultant Richard Aboulafia of Virginia-based Teal Group, who has read the report, said Rand did “a good job of documenting (what) has been an open secret in the airplane business,” which is that flawed government policies have led to the failure of Chinese aircraft manufacturing. “The Chinese have great talent, a great market, and great resources,” Aboulafia said. “You have to work awfully hard to destroy its prospects of getting into commercial aviation.”

Media Outlet: The Street Tags Aircraft Market | China

26
March
2014

Airbus Signs Long-Term Helicopter Deal With China Manufacturer

Featuring: Richard L. Aboulafia

Airbus Signs Long-Term Helicopter Deal With China Manufacturer

Richard Aboulafia, aviation consultant with Fairfax, Va.-based Teal Group, said that partnerships between Western and Chinese aviation companies have tended to unravel over time because of intellectual-property issues.

Media Outlet: The Wall Street Journal Tags Airbus | China | Helicopters | Intellectual Property

13
April
2012

Satellites to China Fuel Dispute Between Thales, U.S.

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

Satellites to China Fuel Dispute Between Thales, U.S.

The State Department is pursuing "all available options," including administrative penalties, to compel Thales Alenia Space to disclose any U.S.-made parts in eight communications satellites it sold to China, Assistant Secretary for Legislative Affairs David Adams told Congress. The department's options include withholding licenses the company needs as prime contractor on a $3 billion program to build 81 satellites for Iridium Communications Inc. (IRDM), according to Marco Caceres, a military and civilian space analyst. He said that could postpone Iridium's plans to launch the first of the new satellites in 36 months and possibly force the company to find a U.S. contractor to take over the program. "If they delay it by six months, Iridium needs to do it sooner rather than later," Caceres of the Fairfax, Virginia- based Teal Group, said in an interview.

Media Outlet: Bloomberg News Tags China | Iridium | Technology Exports

16
February
2010

Trade Tiffs with China Heating Up

Featuring: Joel Johnson

Trade Tiffs with China Heating Up

Beijing will tread carefully in punishing Boeing over sales of Patriot missiles to Taipei. Near term, it will tilt more purchases by state-controlled carriers away from the U.S. aircraft manufacturer to Airbus, but Airbus lacks the capacity to meet all of China's long-range civil aviation needs. And there's another consideration, as aerospace consultant Joel Johnson of the Teal Group Corp. explains: "A little over half their fleet is Boeing. If they retaliate against (Boeing) aircraft parts, they're only screwing their own airlines."

Media Outlet: Kiplinger Tags Boeing | China | Trade

01
December
1997

Space Debris: Small But Growing Problem

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

Space Debris: Small But Growing Problem

While China’s anti-satellite system test created a bit more debris in orbit by reducing China’s Feng Yun 1C polar-orbiting weather satellite to a cloud of debris, it is everyday space operations that contribute the vast majority of the space junk in orbit. “The response to the Chinese test was probably overdone,” says Marco Caceres, senior analyst and director of space studies for Teal Group of Fairfax, Va. “Debris is going into space all the time. Satellites are maneuvered down and burn up in the atmosphere and spread into tiny pieces.

Often where there is a launch, the upper stage of the rocket eventually drops off before placing satellite into orbit. Much of that will burn in the atmosphere, but some will stay in orbit. … The Chinese test was not anything particularly alarming in itself,” he says. “The issue of space debris is alarming, particularly for commercial operators and especially at low-Earth orbit, where a lot of that debris will end up. There is still a chance to be hit, even though it’s a huge area. This has to be addressed as we put up more satellites.”

Media Outlet: Via Satellite Tags Anti-Satellite System Test | China | Space | Space Debris

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