Marco A. Caceres

IN THE MEDIA

Marco joined Teal Group in March 1990. Previously, he was a market analyst for Jane's Information Group of the UK. As editor of both the Jane's DMS Defense & Aerospace Agencies and DMS Electronic Systems publications, Marco analyzed and wrote about the R&D and procurement activities within the defense- and aerospace-related agencies of the federal government, with a focus on the markets for major electronic warfare (EW) subsystems. Additionally, Marco edited Jane's DMS Budget Intelligence newsletter--a weekly covering defense budget news. Full Bio >

06
March
2017

Don't expect a space race between SpaceX and NASA. They need each other

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

Don't expect a space race between SpaceX and NASA. They need each other

SpaceX, the upstart company, and NASA, the government agency, both have plans to venture to Mars and orbit the moon. But that doesn’t mean they’ve launched a new space race.

In fact, NASA has long been SpaceX’s most important customer, providing contracts to deliver cargo and eventually astronauts to the International Space Station. And the Hawthorne company will need NASA’s technical support to achieve the first of its grand ambitions in deep space.

A major milestone for the partnership came in 2012 when SpaceX launched its first NASA cargo load, making it the first private company to send a spacecraft to the space station.

Marco Caceres, senior space analyst at the Teal Group, said the NASA supply missions gave SpaceX “almost instant credibility."

"Having NASA as an anchor client allowed them to have enough revenue flow so that they could establish themselves and eventually diversify and get some commercial contracts and eventually to be able to get into the military establishment,” he said.

Today, SpaceX and Boeing Co. are developing separate crew capsules as part of NASA contracts to transport astronauts to the space station.

SpaceX noted that this NASA program provided most of the funding to develop the Dragon 2 spacecraft, which will make the moon trip. It is planning to conduct the first test flight of the Dragon crew capsule in November, followed by a flight test with humans in May 2018.

Media Outlet: The Washington Post Tags NASA | SpaceX

18
January
2017

SpaceX sends 10 satellites into orbit, lands rocket booster on drone ship in first flight since September explosion

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

SpaceX sends 10 satellites into orbit, lands rocket booster on drone ship in first flight since September explosion

Four months after a launch pad explosion, SpaceX returned to flight Saturday morning, delivering 10 satellites into orbit and landing its first-stage booster on a floating drone ship. Analysts had described the launch as “all-important” for the Hawthorne space company to reestablish customer confidence and momentum after a Sept. 1 launchpad explosion in Florida destroyed a Falcon 9 rocket and a commercial communications satellite perched on top. But beyond the specter of the accident, stakes were high for Saturday’s launch because it involved deploying the first 10 satellites of a new commercial constellation for well-known operator Iridium Communications Inc.

The new satellites have more capability than their older counterparts, including higher data speeds. Saturday’s launch is the first of seven that SpaceX will perform for Iridium to carry a total of 70 satellites into orbit.

“There was a lot riding on this for SpaceX, but also for Iridium, and I think they can breathe a sigh of relief,” said Marco Caceres, senior space analyst at the Teal Group.

The launch occurred at 9:54 a.m. Pacific time from Vandenberg Air Force Base, north of Santa Barbara. About eight minutes after liftoff, the first-stage rocket booster landed upright on a floating platform called “Just Read the Instructions” in the Pacific Ocean.

About an hour after the launch, company Chief Executive Elon Musk tweeted that the mission “looks good.” By 11:15 a.m., Musk tweeted that all satellites had been successfully delivered to the correct orbit.

Media Outlet: Los Angeles Times Tags Elon Musk | NASA | SpaceX

31
March
2015

The Problem With the America's Russian Rocket Phase-out

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

The Problem With the America's Russian Rocket Phase-out

Nor does the Pentagon really want a fast-tracked rocket engine, says Marco Caceres, senior analyst and director of space studies at aerospace consultancy Teal Group. "The engine is the core of your rocket, and the majority of things that go wrong in a rocket have to do with the engines," he says, "You really don't want to rush this."

Moreover, the Pentagon plan intends to spread the cost of technology development out via public-private partnerships, each of which would require roughly a dozen private sector space launches each year to remain viable. That launch demand doesn't yet exist, nor does a spike in demand appear on the horizon.

All that places SpaceX in a particularly good position to take on a lot, if not all, of the military's space launches toward the end of this decade, at least until other launch technologies can be adequately matured. Barring a change in Congress's stance on RD-180 imports or some kind of mishap that jeopardizes its certification, SpaceX might not just break ULA's military launch monopoly—it may become the monopoly.

"Overall, SpaceX is starting to look very all-American and very attractive, and ULA looks weak without its Delta IV," Caceres says. "All along ULA has had its eggs in one basket, but that only works as long as you've got a monopoly."

Media Outlet: The Washington Post Tags Atlas V | RD-180 | United Launch Alliance

23
March
2015

A New Space Race Emerges as NASA Prepares to Award Contract to Ferry Supplies to Space Station

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

A New Space Race Emerges as NASA Prepares to Award Contract to Ferry Supplies to Space Station

Marco Caceres, an analyst with the Teal Group, says there is a strong business case for ULA to retire the Delta IV, as the cost for keeping two redundant lines is significant. But he also acknowledged that there is a smart political angle at work. "If they were to cancel the Delta IV medium and all they have is the Atlas V, then there is a better argument to be made for preserving the RD-180 shipments," Caceres said. "No question about that. Have they thought about it? I'm sure people at ULA have considered it as a good strategic move."

But, Caceres said, there are many practical reasons for ULA to move away from the Delta IV, a largely redundant and expensive capacity. He notes that part of the reason Bruno was brought in to lead ULA last summer was to streamline the company in the face of SpaceX's competition. "If the Air Force wants ULA to be more competitive on price, it has to become leaner, and it can't do that with two redundant systems," Caceres said.

Media Outlet: The Washington Post Tags cargo supply | International Space Station | ISS | NASA

23
March
2015

ULA to Retire Delta IV, Push for More RD-180s

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

ULA to Retire Delta IV, Push for More RD-180s

Marco Caceres, an analyst with the Teal Group, says there is a strong business case for ULA to retire the Delta IV, as the cost for keeping two redundant lines is significant. But he also acknowledged that there is a smart political angle at work. "If they were to cancel the Delta IV medium and all they have is the Atlas V, then there is a better argument to be made for preserving the RD-180 shipments," Caceres said. "No question about that. Have they thought about it? I'm sure people at ULA have considered it as a good strategic move."

But, Caceres said, there are many practical reasons for ULA to move away from the Delta IV, a largely redundant and expensive capacity. He notes that part of the reason Bruno was brought in to lead ULA last summer was to streamline the company in the face of SpaceX's competition. "If the Air Force wants ULA to be more competitive on price, it has to become leaner, and it can't do that with two redundant systems," Caceres said.

Media Outlet: Defense News Tags Delta IV | RD-180 | ULA

20
January
2015

Google Said to Be Close to Investing $1 Billion in Musk’s SpaceX

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

Google Said to Be Close to Investing $1 Billion in Musk’s SpaceX

"If Google is committing money to SpaceX, they are likely to be a major investor and a real partner," said Marco Caceres, director of space studies at consultant Teal Group. "Google brings the applications for the satellites to the table, and SpaceX has the technical know-how and the launch capacity."

Media Outlet: Bloomberg Businessweek Tags Google | SpaceX

14
January
2015

Mitsubishi Electric Anticipating Five to Seven Satellite Orders in 2015

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

Mitsubishi Electric Anticipating Five to Seven Satellite Orders in 2015

"I would say [all-electric is] a growing market, it has good potential, but I don't see it as a booming market in the near term," Marco Caceres, senior analyst and director of space studies at the Teal Group told Via Satellite. "[Hybrid propulsion] is a very transitional way of doing it to see if it works. In the end you may end up going to all electric if the technology improves so that it has enough of a kick to get satellites in orbit faster."

Media Outlet: Via Satellite Tags Electric Propulsion | Mitsubishi Electric | Satellites

13
January
2015

Musk Sees Seattle-Made Satellites in Race to Mars

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

Musk Sees Seattle-Made Satellites in Race to Mars

"They're getting the reputation for being a pretty gutsy company that's willing to get things done," Marco Caceres, director of space studies with Teal Group, a Fairfax, Virginia-based consultant, said in a Jan. 10 phone interview.

Media Outlet: Bloomberg Tags Elon Musk | Mars | Satellites | SpaceX

13
January
2015

Moving Forward After the Crash of SpaceShipTwo

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

Moving Forward After the Crash of SpaceShipTwo

Taking that as a guide, VG would need to be, at least, a $2 billion program. But can any company afford to do private space safely? Marco Caceres, a space-industry analyst at Teal Group, named one contender: SpaceX. Founder Elon Musk's company is positioned for success because it's financing its development with commercial and government clients, not celebrities. "That sort of funding won't come from a few hundred adventure seekers," Caceres says. "It's going to take big-time investment."

Media Outlet: Popular Science Tags Elon Musk | SpaceX

10
January
2015

Musk’s SpaceX Rocket-Recapture Bid Thwarted by Hard Landing

Featuring: Marco A. Caceres

Musk’s SpaceX Rocket-Recapture Bid Thwarted by Hard Landing

"Overall, I would rate it as a success," Marco Caceres, director of space studies with Teal Group, a Fairfax, Virginia-based consulting firm, said in a phone interview.

"It is tricky to hit something that small to begin with, but to hit with the right velocity so that it lands perfectly when the barge is moving in the ocean -- that's a tough challenge," Caceres said. "They're not taking the easy way. That's not the conservative approach."

Media Outlet: Bloomberg Tags cargo supply | Falcon 9 | International Space Station | reusable technology | SpaceX

[12 3 4 5  >>  

Teal Group offers online access to all our products through the web. Contact our Sales Staff to obtain a user ID and password for online access. Instructions for accessing the Online Demo are found below. You will only have access to the Online Demo product. You will need Adobe Acrobat Reader to read the reports on the online access site.

logon demoDEMO INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Log on using Demo User ID 2306 and Demo Password teal.
  2. A list of Teal Group Products will appear on the next screen.
  3. You will have access to the online demo and you will be able to see what is available in other services. Accessible reports will appear as clickable text in red under the Title of the Briefing. You will not be able to access reports in unsubscribed services. These report titles will appear as normal text in black.
  4. Click on "Online Demo". The various briefing titles will appear. Click on a section and the sample reports in that section will appear. At this point you can click on the sample report to access the file.

 

To inquire about online access and site licenses please contact Mr. Tim Storey.